Cumbria

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Cumbria Town Guides

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      Lewis
      Keymaster

      Here is a list of our town guides for Cumbria.

      Feel free to explore.

      Alston

      Alston is a relatively remote, small market town located in Cumbria, northwest England. It is situated within the civil parish of Alston Moor, lying close to the conjuncture of the River Nent and the River South Tyne. The town is located 45 miles (72 km) west of Newcastle, 30 miles (48 km) southeast of Carlisle, and 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Penrith. Historically part of Cumberland, Alston lies within the ‘North Pennines’ Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Much of the town centre also has the status of ‘Conservation Area’. In the 2011 UK Census, the population of Alston was recorded as being 1,105 while that of the whole Parish of Alston Moor was 2,088.

      Dalston

      Dalston is a large village and civil parish situated within the Carlisle district of Cumbria, northwest England. The village is located a little over 4 miles (6 km) south of Carlisle and approximately 5 miles (8 km) west of Junction 42 of the M6 motorway. Most of the ‘old’ village is strung out along a mile section of the B2599 road, which runs from the (village) ‘Square’ to the hamlet of Bridgend. The B2599, the parish’s arterial road, also lies close to the west bank of the River Caldew where it passes through Dalston. At the 2011 UK census, the population of Dalston was recorded as 2590, with that of the wider parish being 6,051.

      Grange-Over-Sands

      Grange-over-Sands is a town and civil parish located on the north side of Morecambe Bay in Cumbria, northwest England. The town is located 13 miles (21 km) to the south of Kendal, 25 miles (40 km) east of Barrow-in-Furness and 28 miles (45 km) west of Lancaster. Historically part of Lancashire, since 1974, the town has been administered as part of the South Lakeland district of Cumbria. In the 2011 UK Census Grange-over-Sands had a recorded population of 4,114.

      Arnside

      Arnside is a village and civil parish in south Cumbria, Northwest England. Historically in Westmorland, it lies on the estuary of the River Kent, in the north-eastern corner of Morecambe Bay, near the border with Lancashire. The village is also within the designated Arnside and Silverdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). The village is arguably most famous for its impressive rail viaduct and tidal bore. Arnside had a recorded population of 2,334, at the 2011 UK Census.

      Windermere

      Windermere is a town and civil parish in the South Lakeland District of Cumbria, northwest England. Lake Windermere actually lies about a mile (1.6 km) west of the eponymously named town. It would be easy to confuse the town of Windermere with the nearby older but smaller lakeside settlement of Bowness-on-Windermere. While the civil parish encompasses both settlements, the two towns retain distinctly separate town centres and identities. In the 2011 UK Census, the population of Windermere and the surrounding area was assessed as being 5,837, while that of the wider civil parish, which includes Bowness-on-Windermere, was 8,359.

      Kirkby Lonsdale

      Kirkby Lonsdale is a small town and civil parish in the South Lakeland district of Cumbria, northwest England. The town is situated on the banks the River Lune, and lies 13 miles (21 km) south-east of Kendal, along the A65. The town had a recorded population of 1,843 at the 2011 UK Census.

      Ambleside

      Ambleside is a small market town in Cumbria, in North West England. Historically in Westmorland, it is situated on the northern shore of Lake Windermere, the largest natural lake in England. The town lies within the Lake District National Park, about 4 miles north of the town of Winderemere and is administered by South Lakeland District Council. In the UK census of 2011, the population was recorded as 2,529.

      Brampton

      Brampton is a small market town and civil parish, situated in the northeast of the county of Cumbria, in northwest England. Brampton lies about 9 miles (14 km) east of Carlisle and 2 just miles (3 km) south of the famed Hadrian’s Wall. Historically part of Cumberland, the town is located just off the A69 truck road which runs east between Carlisle and Newcastle. At the 2011 UK census, the population of Brampton was recorded as 4,627.

      Wigton

      Wigton is a small market town in Cumbria, north-west England. It’s situated about 12 miles south-west of Carlisle and 16 miles north-east of Maryport, between the Caldbeck Fells and the Solway coast, on the fringe of the Lake District. It’s an ancient settlement dating back to pre-medieval times. In the 2011 census, the population of Wigton was recorded as being 5,831.

      Silloth

      Silloth is a small port town, seaside resort and civil parish in Cumbria, north-west England. It’s situated on the shoreline of the Solway Firth, facing the hills of Southern Galloway and backed by the fells of the Lake District. The town’s located some 18 miles (29 km) north of Workington and 22 miles (35 km) west of Carlisle. The town also lies 12 miles (19 km) north of Maryport, along the B5300 coast road. Silloth is particularly known for its superb spacious seafront ‘green’, well-appointed promenade and as Cumbria’s only seaside resort. The town had a permanent resident population of 2,906 at the 2011 Census.

      Ulverston

      Ulverston is a market town and large civil parish in the South Lakeland district of Cumbria, North West England. Historically in Lancashire, the town is 8 miles north-east of Barrow-in-Furness. It lies just 4 miles from the Lake District, just north of Morecambe Bay and neighbours Swarthmoor, Pennington and Rosside. The town is particularly renowned as the birthplace of Stan Laurel, and as home to the world’s only Laurel and Hardy Museum. In the 2011 census, the population of Ulverston was recorded as being 11,678.

      Bowness-on-Windermere

      Bowness-on-Windermere is a tourist town that sits along the shores of England’s largest inland body of water, Lake Windermere, situated in Cumbria, North-West England. The township is situated on the lake’s east bank, almost exactly halfway along its 10.5-mile length. Bowness is particularly renowned for its scenic landscape and the great range of outdoor watersports that can be undertaken on the Lake. In the 2011 UK Census, the population of Bowness and was assessed as being 2,522, while that of the wider civil parish, which includes the town of Windermere, was 8,359.

      Barrow-in-Furness, commonly known as Barrow, is a town and borough in the county of Cumbria, north-west England. Historically part of Lancashire, it was incorporated into the new county of Cumbria in the major local government reorganisation of 1974. Situated at the tip of the Furness peninsula, close to the Lake District, it is bordered by Morecambe Bay, the Duddon Estuary and the Irish Sea. In 2011 census, Barrow’s population was determined as 56,745, making it the second-largest settlement in Cumbria, after Carlisle.

      Kendal

      Kendal is a market town and tourist centre within the South Lakeland District of Cumbria, north-west England. Historically in the now-defunct county of Westmorland, it is situated about 8 miles (13 km) south-east of Windermere, 19 miles (31 km) and 23 miles (37 km) north-east of Barrow-in-Furness. The town lies in the valley of the River Kent from where it derives its name. Kendal is particularly renowned for its mint cake and as a producer of tobacco products. In the 2011 Census, the town was found to have a total population of 28,586, making it the third-largest settlement in Cumbria behind Carlisle and Barrow-in-Furness.

      Keswick

      Keswick is a market town and tourist centre in the county of Cumbria, north-west England. It’s situated at the northern end of the Lake District National Park and lies next to Derwent Water. The town is considered by many as the de facto capital of ‘the Lakes’ and is particularly renowned for its scenic landscape and the wide range of outdoor and sporting activities it offers.

      Workington

      Workington is a port town situated on the west Cumbrian coast of north-west England. Set in the Borough of Allerdale at the mouth of the River Derwent, it’s some 32 miles southwest of the county capital, Carlisle, and about 9 miles west of the North Lakes. The town has a long industrial history, linked to both the coal mining and steel industries. At the 2011 Census, it had a population of 25,207.

      Whitehaven

      Whitehaven is a port town on the west coast of Cumbria, north-west England. It lies midway between Cumbria’s two largest communities, Carlisle and Barrow-in-Furness, and close to the Lake District National Park. Additionally, it is the administrative seat for the Borough of Copeland’s district council. The population of the town was 23,986 at the 2011 Census.

      Maryport

      Maryport is a small coastal town situated at the southernmost point of the Solway Firth, in Cumbria, North West England. It’s located about 26 miles (42 km) south-west of the county town of Carlisle, and about a 30 minute drive from the North Lakes. The town also lies at the northern end of the former Cumberland Coalfield. Maryport has a long and colourful history dating back to Roman times. The 2011 UK official census put the population of Maryport at 11,262.

      Cockermouth

      Cockermouth is an ancient market town situated in the west of Cumbria, North West England. It derives its name from its geographical position, which is at the confluence of the River Derwent, and its tributary, the River Cocker. While it gives all the impression, feel and atmosphere of ‘Lakes’ town, it doesn’t legitimately qualify, as it lies just outside the boundary of the Lake District National Park. However, what it does qualify for, according to many of its tourists, is that it is one of the friendliest places in the county. The 2011 UK official census put the population of Cockermouth at 8,761.

      Carlisle

      The historic city of Carlisle is located in the North West of England, its centre is about 10 miles (16 km) south of the Scottish border. It’s the only city and largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, serving as both the county’s main administrative centre and capital. Its local status and strategic location mean that it also acts as the gateway to the nearby Lake District (England’s largest and most visited National Park) and the south-west Scottish Borders.

      At the time of the last UK census in 2011, the city’s population was determined as 75,306, with a further 32,218 people established as living within the peri-urban area.

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